Battle of Grant’s Hill

**NOTE TO READERS – Here’s a battle off the beaten path which you’ve probably never heard of.**

September 14, 1758. The French and Indian War.

Battle of Grant's Hill

The Battle of Grant’s Hill was very one-sided, as the British showed yet again that they were not proficient in fast moving, close in wilderness fighting. Twenty years later in the American Revolution, they still weren’t. There’s no trace remaining of the battle area. It’s now in the middle of the “Golden Triangle” in downtown Pittsburgh. The site of the heaviest fighting is the location of the Allegheny County Courthouse.

This battle was fought as part of the British effort to capture Fort Duquesne in present-day Pittsburgh, PA during the French and Indian War. It shouldn’t have been fought at all. Major James Grant was leading a reconnaissance-in-force mission from Fort Ligonier, about 50 miles to the east. He had strict orders from his commander, Col. Henri Bouquet, to not get into a decisive engagement. He was to do a thorough recon, take prisoners and gather intelligence.

Grant ran his mission to perfection. He got his force undetected to within 1/4 mile of the fort on a hill overlooking the forks of the three rivers. Then he got stupid. Seeing Fort Duquesne as a ramshackle, under-manned fort, he decided to attack. It was a disaster. He lost 400 of 800 men and himself became a POW.

Survivors made their way back to Fort Ligonier and reported to Col. Bouquet that Fort Duquesne was a mighty bastion defended by thousands. That cast a pall over the entire British plan. In reality, Fort Duquesne was falling apart and the French were preparing to abandon it.

The hill where Grant was defeated is no longer there. It was leveled a century ago to make room for expansion of the downtown business district. However, the area is still called Grant’s Hill and has been since the earliest days of the city.

I’ve got lots more information about the Battle of Grant’s Hill and the Fort Duquesne campaign. Just click on the links.

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