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Welcome to our blog

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NOTE TO READERS: Here’s a few items to guide you on our blog.

This page is our permanent first page, called a sticky page. It was updated on October 1 and will remain on top permanently. Our most recent post is directly under this one and then they roll in date sequence from most recent to earliest.

Be sure to check out our new tag word cloud search functions in the sidebar.  We’ve also added a Geocaching Storefront to the sidebar with links to our favorite geocaching products.

Also in the page bar at the top of the blog are five pages of background and instruction on geocaching.  The titles are self-explanatory. These short pages are more than enough to get you started.

Cheers … Boris and Natasha

Hi and welcome to our newly updated blog. Designed as a companion to our website, we use it for shorter pages than we typically put on the site.

We affectionately refer to each other as Boris and Natasha (usually with “dahlink” at the end) – retirees, snowbirds, explorers, geocachers, munzee and benchmark hunters, history lovers, sometime photographers, freelance writers and lifelong learners who can show up almost anywhere.

KidsRN in action

Natasha is relentless in her quest for geocaches. Here, she gives it her all in the Black Hills. Mt. Rushmore is in the upper left hand corner.

Our vision for Off The Beaten Path is a family friendly blog that promotes interest in outdoor activities, curiosity about the world around us and lifelong learning. Our vehicle for that is geocaching and related activities, plus all that goes with them.

You would be hard-pressed to find another activity which is more fun, positive, educational and family friendly than geocaching and its siblings. My 88 year old mother has been out with us. Our grandkids (now 6 and 4) went out with us in their strollers. They really love hunting munzees and can both handle a smart phone like you wouldn’t believe. Some of the best times I ever had as a Dad were with my youngest son hunting down geocaches in the wilds of Montana and Wyoming. When I was teaching school, I used it in my math classes to teach all kinds of things.

One thing you can be sure of – the pages of this blog and our other related sites will develop skills and take you places you would have never known about otherwise.  The only adverse effect we’ve encountered is G.A.S. – Geocaching Addiction Syndrome.  Once it gets in your blood, it’s hard to walk away.

Our adventures have taken us to ghost towns, caves, mountain tops, waterfalls and more out of the way places than we can recall.  It’s been a hoot.  We’ve geocached in 38 states and have a plan in place to finish all 50 by the end of 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 (or thereabouts).

You never know what you might find here. We love forts, battlefields, ghost towns, one of a kind diners, cheeseburgers, skin-on French fries, anything to do with National Parks and anything else that’s off the beaten path. The tougher, longer, higher, creepier or more calorie-laden it is, the better we like it. Of course, we do normal stuff, too. We’ll mix things up to keep it interesting.

KidsRN at Mt. Rushmore cache site.

Mission accomplished safe and sound. No humans were injured in the production of this blog.

This is an open blog for families, adventurers, explorers, vagabonds and anybody else who might share our passions.  There’s no arm chair traveling here.  We’ve been to all the places we blog about and most of the pictures are ours.

See you in the blogosphere. …Boris and Natasha

KD’s Bar-B-Q, Midland, TX

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NOTE TO READERS: This is my first post done completely with a custom external CSS page. I like it. I did the whole post in the code page – no “point’n’click” or “drag’n’drop” in the WordPress interface. It’s a $30 upgrade but well worth it. I put it off for as long as I could, but finally got tired of WordPress doing strange things. Posting is much slicker and you can completely customize the look of the page. If you’d like to see what it looks like, I’ve posted the CSS sheet and the HTML code I used for this post in the public folder of my Dropbox account. It’s a file called blogcode.txt. Here’s the direct link. It will open the file in your browser in a new window. From there, you can copy and paste it into Notepad.

During our travels and adventures, we are always on the lookout for some good eating. We try to stay away from chains (with the exception of In-n-Out Burger) in favor of local diners, dives and cafes. We struck culinary gold while driving across Texas on I-20. Just off Exit 138 in Midland, TX is KD’s Bar-B-Q. You can see it from the highway and we headed straight for it. The place was full of families, truckers and oil workers and with good reason. It was some of the best BBQ eating we’ve ever had – maybe even the best. Check out the pictures. This was our kind of place.

Front of KD's BBQ

Years ago, KD’s was a feed store. It still has that ambiance.

They’ve added a few modern conveniences, like ceiling fans. In the adjoining saloon, there are three big screen TV’s with NASCAR and Fox News. You won’t see MSNBC, Wimbledon or The View here. I reckon you might catch a Cowboys game in season.

Inside KD's BBQ

Here’s that feed store ambiance. Wood floors, metal tables, tin ceiling, exposed pipes and duct work. Everybody was super friendly, as they always are in rural Texas. The free fixins bar is in the center. It features plenty of the usual meat and potato add ons, along with hot sauce with names like Nuclear Waste. Be careful what you wish for.

Now to the important stuff – how to get the food. You enter through the smokehouse door, grab a tray and put a big piece of wax paper on it. Step up to the pit and tell ’em what you want. They slap it on the tray. Next, over to the line for sides, drinks and desserts. Pay at the end of the line then top off at the fixins bar. Staff cruise the floor constantly, picking up trays and cleaning tables. If it’s crowded, just sit down with some strangers.

Food at KD's

Now we’re talkin’. Brisket, ham, turkey, chicken, sausages, pulled pork and more. Then it’s off to the counter for your sides and then to the fixins bar.

The only downside of KD’s is that it’s a bit pricey. Plan on about $20 a person. Everything on the grill is priced at $14 a pound with an $8 minimum. No use taking just a little. Sides are priced individually. One other problem we ran into was that we were so full when we walked out, we skipped looking for a couple of geocaches that were close by, including one in the parking lot.

Trust me – that doesn’t happen very often.

Bon appetit … Boris and Natasha

Back in the Saddle Again

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Hi again,

As you’ve no doubt noticed, I haven’t posted in a while.  I got to a point at the beginning of the summer where I was burned out with all this web and blog stuff.  I was trying to post too much too quickly about too many things. It wasn’t fun any more, so I walked away.  I really wasn’t sure if I’d be back.

We did a lot of cool stuff this summer. In addition to welcoming our new grand daughter, we cruised the back roads of my native Pennsylvania and just got back from exploring Michigan’s Upper Peninsula (where the yoopers live).  And of course, we criss-crossed Minnesota and Wisconsin in our never ending quest for geocaches, out-of-the-way places and non-chain restaurants.  I took lots of pictures with my new Nikon D3100 and constantly thought “This would be a great blog entry” but I never got around to it.

Sideling Hill Turnpike Tunnel

Here’s one of our excursions from the summer of 2012. This is the eastern end of the Sideling Hill Tunnel on an abandoned section of the Pennsylvania Turnpike. I grew up not far from here and remember driving on this stretch of road.  It finally got too congested and they bypassed it in the late 60’s.  The 22 mile track has two tunnels. The other one is Ray’s Hill about five miles west. The entire stretch is open for biking although it is not a formal bike trail. This was the longest tunnel built on the turnpike – 6,017 feet long. That’s why you can’t see any light at the end of the tunnel. You need to have flamethrower headlights to negotiate this one. There were geocaches in, around and above the tunnels. We got some but not all.  They were tough and it was really hot.  The tunnel is nice and cool inside and a cool wind blows out of it constantly, much to Natasha’s delight.

I got the bug again a few weeks ago.  Since then, I’ve been busy getting my web house in order.   The main improvement here is a better sidebar.  After experimenting with widgets for a while, I came up with a combination I like.  It puts a lot more information at the reader’s fingertips and has clear, self-explanatory titles and buttons.  You can mouse over a link to get even more information about the content. 

Be sure to checkout the new Geocaching Storefront widget, where you can find most of the stuff we talk about in our instructional posts. BTW, I don’t get paid for anything. If you see something listed anywhere in this blog, it’s because we use it and like it.

You’ll also find a new keyword search widget based on the tag cloud.  It’s got a little introduction above it.  It resolves the dilemma I had about new material rapidly getting buried and good stuff essentially disappearing.  I think I’ve fixed that.  I’ve tested it and it works like a charm.

The blog content will be shorter, less involved stuff – instructions, reviews, pictures, etc.  No more long rambling posts .  I’ve got some catching up to do.  There are a couple of series I started like Top 10 Geocaches and Intro to Geocaching that I never completed.  They go to the head of the list.  I’ve also got a lot of new stuff from our summer travels.  Among our best finds – abandoned Civil War trenches in the middle of nowhere in Pennsylvania, a NASA rocket launch base at the  very tip of Michigan’s Keweenaw (Upper) Peninsula and a great tavern in Prescott, WI called The Brickyard.  We’ll let you in on all of it.

Outer stockade at Fort Ligonier

Another one of our excursions this summer – the fully restored Fort Ligonier in Ligonier, PA. A British fort during the French and Indian War, it guarded the Forbes Road to Pittsburgh and Fort Pitt. It was attacked twice but held both times. As you can see, it is a formidable position. What you don’t see is the inner walls, moat and redoubts behind the outer stockade. It also bristled with cannons, mortars and swivel guns. The Loyalhanna River ran right along the base of the rocks back then but was re-routed when Route 30 (the Lincoln Highway) was built almost 100 years ago.

Our companion website has a new URL – exploreoffthebeatenpath.com.  It will have the longer, more involved stuff.  My current project is the 1862 Dakota War here in Minnesota.  What?  You thought  Minnesota was settled by Micheal Landon and Melissa Gilbert during Little House on the Prairie? You didn’t know the largest Indian war in U.S. history was fought here? That’s alright.  Nobody else does either.  I’ll let you know when it’s published.

I’ll be moving up previous posts from the series I started and cross linking them so they don’t get lost. The four or five instructional posts on Introduction to Geocaching will be permanent pages linked at the top of the home screen.  That way, they’re always available and easy to find.    This housekeeping may take a few days, so bear with me.

Thanks to all who have commented, followed and liked.  There’s lots more to come.

Best ….. Dan

Geocaching Destinations – The Roadkill Cafe

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At the intersection of the Foley Beach Expressway and Alabama 98 in Baldwin County is a little town called Elberta.  About a half mile east of the intersection is a diner called the Roadkill Cafe.  Their motto is “You kill it, we grill it.” We were out geocaching in the vicinity one day and ran across it.  Well, with a name like that, how can you resist? 

The outside of the Roadkill Cafe.

The Roadkill Cafe
25076 State St
Elberta, AL 36530
(251) 986-5337
Hours: M-F 10:30 to 12:30
or there abouts
“You kill it, we grill it.”
Check out the mural on the right.

This is definitely a locals place.  Everybody who comes in and out seems to know everyone else. We were the only outsiders but were welcomed warmly.  Everybody was real nice.  The menu is on the chalkboard by the door and all the food is laid out buffet style, including salad and dessert.  For eight bucks, you get it all and as much as you want except your drinks.

This is real home-style Southern cooking.  I had chicken fried steak, red beans and rice and cornbread.  KidsRN had fried chicken and mashed potatoes with lemon cake for dessert.  It was all good stuff.  We could have easily gone back for seconds and thirds but resisted the temptation.  Most of the people there did not.

This is the kind of fine dining we look for on our adventures.  There are over a dozen geocaches within a short drive so you can roadkill a couple of birds with one stone.  If you want to eat here, you’ll have to time it right. They are only open Monday – Friday from 10:30 AM to 12:30 PM although locals were streaming in after the closed sign went up.  Maybe they stay open until the food runs out.

Inside the Roadkill Cafe

Inside the Roadkill. Clean and simple. Menu on the chalkboard. Eight dollar buffet in the middle. This was taken about 10 minutes after closing. Before that, all the tables were full. There were still some locals wandering in after this was taken.

So forget your diet for a day and check out the Roadkill Cafe.

Y’all come see us….The Cachemanian Devils

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